Pilgrimage

 photo 150_zpsdf360974.png
 


 
~~ 1 ~~
 
shrines along the road
where six pilgrims fall at dusk
pleading for mercy
 
~~ 2 ~~
 
meandering roads—
it is not easy to guess
the hidden dangers
 
~~ 3 ~~
 
ferocious noon sun—
murderous midday assault
on weary pilgrims
 
~~ 4 ~~
 
ten years down the road—
list of lumpy double beds
still disturbs her sleep
 
~~ 5 ~~
 
inns along the road—
a certain type of pilgrim
will not spend the night
 
~~ 6 ~~
 
at the holy site
memories fuel prayers—
her warm devotion
 
~~ 7 ~~
 
a red cricket cage—
from behind the bamboo bars
desolate chirping

 
© 2014 by Magical Mystical Teacher
 
More Carpe Diem #412
 
More Poetry Pantry #191
 
More The Sunday Whirl, Wordle 150

Posted on March 2, 2014, in 5-7-5, Carpe Diem, The Poetry Pantry, The Sunday Whirl and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 49 Comments.

  1. You have chronicled the tough life of the pilgrim!

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      I suppose no pilgrim’s life is easy. I’ve been reading The Art of Pilgrimage by Phil Cousineau. In it he asks: “How will you answer the voice who asks you now to describe what you are enduring halfway through your pilgrimage? For every time we move toward a significant goal, the world has a tendency to throw terrible obstacles in our way.”

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 1:55 AM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  2. When they decided on going for a pilgrimage it is all about sacrifice. Very apparent here MMT!

    Hank

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      In his book The Art of Pilgrimage, Phil Cousineau writes:

      “Never doubt for a moment that there will be darkness and disappointment on your travels. The question is, How much courage can we muster to deal with it and move on? Can we transform painful moments into instructive ones? How quick are our reflexes?”

  3. The end verse is just wonderful in the way it stands out bright red..and the nagging click of crickets..a pilgrimage that sticks in the reader’s head!

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      You find crickets annoying, do you? I’ve often wondered why it is that crickets get such a bad rap. I rather enjoy their music myself. However, each to his or her own! 😉

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 3:15 AM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  4. i like the end. I find crickets rather reassuring and I can’t help but think of the princess and the pea when i think of lumpy mattresses

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      Thanks for bringing that snippet of fairy tale literature into this discussion. Would that we would all be as sensitive as the princess, not necessarily with peas, but with each other!

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 7:31 AM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  5. Interesting set. I enjoyed traveling through them. My favorite though was the wry/ humorous:
    ten years down the road—
    list of lumpy double beds
    still disturbs her sleep
    Truth in this one for sure! We have got to let those lumpy beds go.

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      Sometimes it not so easy to let go of the hard parts of the pilgrimage. Sometimes, as Phil Cousineau points out in The Art of Pilgrimage, it’s not even advisable to let them go:

      “Remember that the risks you took, the physical and spiritual dangers you’ve encountered, the financial and spiritual sacrifices you’ve made, were to rediscover what is most sacred in your life.”

      Including lumpy beds, I presume! 😉

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 7:34 AM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  6. Oh! I would probably be the pilgrim who ‘springs’ the cricket! Thanks for a nice Sunday morning pilgrimage through your imagination!

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      Your heart is in the right place—right there with the cricket! 😉

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 8:31 AM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  7. I like the crickets. They put me in mind of a soft summer twilight, resting on the patio, perhaps daydreaming, or even praying. Our lives are a pilgrimage and we choose the path daily without knowing the ultimate destination. I’m with WabiSabi: free the crickets and let them sing.

    Elizabeth
    http://soulsmusic.wordpress.com/2014/03/01/first-day-of-the-month-10110/

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      Is it possible, I wonder, to undertake a pilgrimage without a particular destination in mind?

  8. Oh, the desolate chirping! Loved these – a very weary pilgrim in this selection!

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      I imagine this pilgrim becomes more alert and more energised at the sound of the cricket’s chirping.

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 9:51 AM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  9. I like the many ways you’ve used the road. We are all on a pilgrimage and it’s never going to be easy. I really don’t mind the crickets, I’d turn them loose too.

  10. That is an interestin journey, pilgrims on a pilgramage. Nicely done!

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      I’m glad you could join the pilgrimage today! 😉

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 10:19 AM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  11. all that’s expected on a pilgrim’s journey happen…the weary soul’s prayer seems to become a desolate chirping….

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      Thank you for pointing out the connection between the human’s praying and the cricket’s chirping! 😉

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 10:41 AM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  12. The ending with the crickets chirping is nice! Crickets accompanying one is always nice as they are always there on your journey!

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      Unfortunately, some pilgrims would reach for the insecticide when confronted with a cricket! 😉

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 12:02 PM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  13. mmt, this reminded of Mexico. Well done.

    Pamela

  14. This was a very interesting set–Is it difficult to write to prompts in a shorter form?

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      I’m not good at sustained verse. I find little snippets much easier to write than long poems. Try it—you might like it! 😉

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 1:12 PM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

      • I really like shorter forms–and write in a minimalist style–I find prompts often difficult for me–maybe I think too hard about them

        • magicalmysticalteacher

          I work at it the prompts, but I guess I don’t think too much about them, but rather fly by the proverbial seat of my pants! 😉

          On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 4:52 PM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

          >

  15. I too find crickets reassuring but do not like to see them caged. Pilgrimages and punishing oneself are strange ways to find truth. Finding ourselves is adifferent matter as we discover our unimportance.

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      With WabiSabi as my companion on the journey, the caged crickets will be liberated in short order!

      The only punishment I see in these verses is the “ferocious noon sun.” The pilgrims didn’t choose it, but to get to their destination, they are enduring it. I suppose they could sit it out until evening, but then they’d be stumbling around in the dark, so which is worse?

      “How we pack our bags,” Phil Cousineau writes in The Art of Pilgrimage, “defines our journey.”

      If we pack our backs with a sense of self-unimportance, then I suspect we are likely to find only trivial things and trinkets along the way.

      However, if we pack our bags with a sense of awe and wonder, then we will probably be able to echo the ancient Hebrew poet’s exclamation: “I am fearfully and wonderfully made” (Psalm 139:14).

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 1:46 PM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  16. Pilgrimeage like this… what a hardship… grim indeed.

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      “Never doubt for a moment that there will be darkness and disappointment on your travels,” Phil Cousineau writes in The Art of Pilgrimage. “The question is, How much courage can we muster to deal with it and move on? Can we transform painful moments into instructive ones? How quick are our reflexes?”

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 1:47 PM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  17. The life of pilgrims caught in a nice series of haiku mmt. A pilgrimage is tough, but also joyful and giving insight … and I think that pilgrims are forgetting their tough walk as they have reached the end of their pilgrimage. Thank you for sharing.

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      I think you’re right. When the journey ends, the hardships are soon forgotten, and we find ourselves telling stories about what happened along the way.

      As Phil Cousineau writes in The Art of Pilgrimage: “The story that we bring back from our journeys is the boon. It is the gift of grace that was passed to us in the heart of our journey.”

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 2:10 PM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  18. Several friends and I are planning to traverse the last 150 km of the Camino in Spain. This brought the trip into the present

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      You are looking forward to a very special pilgrimage indeed! May it be a fruitful time for your soul.

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 2:35 PM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  19. A tough road to travel..

  20. a warrior’s haiku episode, MMT. well done!

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      I suppose pilgrims can be warriors! At any rate, “All our journeys are rhapsodies on the theme of discovery,” Phil Cousineau writes in The Art of Pilgrimage. We may even discover along the way that we are warriors!

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 6:49 PM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  21. The end lines are so brilliant… Absolutely amazing

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      Sometimes brilliance surprises us right where we are. “Are there no drops of honey on the leaves right before your eyes?” Phil Cousineau asks in The Art of Pilgrimage.

      Thanks so much for your visit!

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 9:04 PM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

  22. #6 warms my heart and #7 is stunning. Enjoyed reading the others as well. Am feeling the weary pilgrim myself lately.

    • magicalmysticalteacher

      Weariness is apparently an unavoidable part of pilgrimage.

      “In other words,” Phil Cousineu writes in The Art of Pilgrimage, “if the journey you have chosen is indeed a pilgrimage, a soulful journey, it will be rigorous. Ancient wisdom suggests if you aren’t trembling as you approach the sacred, it isn’t the real thing. The sacred, in its various guises as holy ground, art, or knowledge, evokes emotion and commotion.”

      On Sun, Mar 2, 2014 at 9:37 PM, Magical Mystical Teacher wrote:

      >

      • I guess I qualify as on a pilgrimage then. I thought I’d found the end but apparently life is a pilgrimage if one seeks healing or any better emotional place. Thank you for that definition.

  23. Ferocious noon sun – that is what we are having now, MMT. Thoughtful. Somehow, the words trial and tribulation come to my mind.

    How are you?

  24. I’ve slept in tired motels with lumpy beds, so I can appreciate what those pilgrims are suffering!

    Empty Teacup

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