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Praise the Lord: A Haibun


This is my morning ritual, taught to me by the elders—women I met on holy ground. Turning to the east, I place a poem on my tongue, as though it were a communion wafer. Like the wafer melting in a faithful person’s mouth, I know the poem on my tongue will die if I do not sing it aloud, whether anybody hears it or not. So I sing: “Let everything that has breath praise the Lord.” Five times I sing the ancient words. And after the fifth time I laugh, for things all round me have joined the song: chickadees and caterpillars; butterflies and blacksnakes; mosquitos, mergansers, and marigolds. Everything with breath is praising the Lord. And the song is glorious.


Unexpected rain—
the old stone Buddha’s broad lap
now holds an ocean.

 

Haibun © 2020 by Magical Mystical Teacher
 
 
More The Whirligig #268
 
More Writers’ Pantry #22 at Poets and Storytellers United

 

The Gift of Words: A Haibun


Words are the building blocks of thought—and stories. Words spoken by a blind poet around the campfires of old celebrated the cunning ways of a rogue named Odysseus. Words written by Hebrew poets on parchment still tell the tale of the origins of our world: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.”
 
My special education students use words every day, not to tell stories, but for far more mundane purposes: “May I go to the restroom?” “I need to sharpen my pencil.” “Can I get a drink of water?”
 
My students’ vocabularies are limited, and one of my jobs is to help them increase their vocabularies, because words are the building blocks of thought—and stories.
 
I select five words at random from a list—wrinkles, envy, odyssey, untidy, falcon—and ask my students to find the definitions, and use each word in a sentence. When that task proves too daunting for more than half of them, I make up sentences, write them on the board, and ask my students to copy them.
 
“Get acquainted with these words,” I say, “because tomorrow we’re going to use them to write a story.”
 
And we do:
 
Once upon a time there was a falcon named Julian (although sometimes he called himself Joshua). He was a very confused falcon—probably because he lived in an untidy nest. One day he decided to start an odyssey. The odyssey would take him to a magical land where the phoenixes rise every morning. The odyssey lasted so long that wrinkles appeared on the falcon’s face. He grew wise, and became the envy of other birds who lacked wisdom.
 
“I like that!” I exclaim as we finish our story. “I think I could turn what we’ve written into a book.”
 
Even if I never expand the story of Julian the Confused Falcon into a book, this little writing exercise engages every student—even my non-readers. Like the blind poet of old, they eagerly share their ideas orally as I write them on the board. Unlike Homer, however, my students tell their tale briefly.
 
Who’s to say that a long tale is better than a short one—or vice versa? What’s important is giving my students the gift of words so that one day, without my help, they will be able to tell their own tales as their eager children gather round to listen.

 
Overcast morning:
I search for a new story
in the blackbird’s beak.


 

Haibun © 2019 by Magical Mystical Teacher
 
 
More Midweek Motif at Poets United: “Gift”

Wreckage

Rainbow shell photo rainbowshellPuertoNuevo_zpsbfd672da.jpg
Puerto Nuevo, Baja California Norte, México
 


waiting for a gift
on a lonely stretch of sand
wreckage from the sea

 
Text and photo © 2014 by Magical Mystical Teacher
 
More I Heart Macro at Shine the Divine
 
More Haiku My Heart at Recuerda Mi Corazon
 
More Sunday Scribblings 2: “Waiting for a Gift”

Temple Precincts

original
 
 


A flabby old priest,
recumbent in the temple,
leers as pilgrims pray.
 
~~ ~~ ~~
 
An indignant priest
shoves aside the woman’s gift
with abusive shouts.
 
~~ ~~ ~~
 
stench of holiness
rising in clouds of incense—
morning sacrifice

 
© 2013 by Magical Mystical Teacher
 
More Carpe Diem’s Freestyle #1
 
More Three Word Wednesday: “Flabby, Indignant, Stench”